WikiArtLeaks

WikiArtLeaks

Artwork wants to be free.

Important modern and contemporary art straight to your browser.

For too long untold seminal artworks have been locked in museum vaults, collectors' houses and private estates. WikiArtLeaks frees the original work from the elite white cubes and ivory towers through weblinks to the online versions of these works. This website does not claim that seeing the original work as intended in a gallery, museum or performance is valueless. In fact, we hope WikiArtLeaks will encourage visitors to go see the originals. WikiArtLeaks' goal is simply to increase access to work that is influential, historically important, aesthetically beautiful and difficult to see because it may be inside expensive museums, in limited locations worldwide, locked in vaults, or simply no longer exhibited. No works are hosted on WikiArtLeaks. All posts link to material posted/mirrored elsewhere online.

Yves Klein
Blue Monochrome
Date:1961
Medium: Dry pigment in synthetic polymer medium on cotton over plywood
Dimensions:6’ 4 7/8” x 55 1/8” (195.1 x 140 cm)
Monochrome abstraction—the use of one color over an entire canvas—has been a strategy adopted by many painters wishing to challenge expectations of what an image can and should represent. Klein likened monochrome painting to an “open window to freedom.” He worked with a chemist to develop his own particular brand of blue. Made from pure color pigment and a binding medium, it is called International Klein Blue. Klein adopted this hue as a means of evoking the immateriality and boundlessness of his own particular utopian vision of the world.
International Klein Blue (or IKB as it is known in art circles) was developed by Yves Klein as part of his search for colors which best represented the concepts he wished to convey as an artist. IKB was developed by Klein and chemists at the French pharmaceutical company Rhône Poulenc to have the same color brightness and intensity as dry pigments, which it achieves by suspending dry pigment in polyvinyl acetate, a synthetic resin otherwise marketed in France at the time by Rhône Poulenc as Rhodopas M or M60A.
In May 1960, Klein deposited a Soleau envelope, registering his paint formulation under the name International Klein Blue (IKB) at the Institut national de la propriété industrielle. The patent was published in April 1961.
Original Recipe (from patent)
Patent No. 63471 Issued Paris, May 19, 1960
IKB has been perfected by Yves Klein le monochrome in the course of the years 1954-55-56-57-58. The current chemical formula is exactly: 
1.2 kilos Rhodopas (paste product) and MA (Rhone Poulenc) (vinyl chrloride) 
2.2 kilos ethyl alcohol. 95% industrial, denatured 
6.0 kilos Ethyl acetate 
A total of 4 kilos 
Mix cold while energetically agitating and never heat uncovered!
Then, mix cold the pure ultramarine blue 1311 in powder with fixative medium, in the proportion of 50%—if one adds 1/10 of the total with pure acetone—and 40%—if one adds pure alcohol.
CONTEMPORARY ADAPTED RECIPE:
Mix together (cold) pure ultramarine blue in powder with fixative medium, in the proportion of 50%.
Ultramarine blue powder and fixative medium can both be purchased in many places. Simpler alternative: find a tube of ultramarine blue that meets your liking and mix with fixative.

Yves Klein

Blue Monochrome

Date:1961

Medium: Dry pigment in synthetic polymer medium on cotton over plywood

Dimensions:6’ 4 7/8” x 55 1/8” (195.1 x 140 cm)

Monochrome abstraction—the use of one color over an entire canvas—has been a strategy adopted by many painters wishing to challenge expectations of what an image can and should represent. Klein likened monochrome painting to an “open window to freedom.” He worked with a chemist to develop his own particular brand of blue. Made from pure color pigment and a binding medium, it is called International Klein Blue. Klein adopted this hue as a means of evoking the immateriality and boundlessness of his own particular utopian vision of the world.

International Klein Blue (or IKB as it is known in art circles) was developed by Yves Klein as part of his search for colors which best represented the concepts he wished to convey as an artist. IKB was developed by Klein and chemists at the French pharmaceutical company Rhône Poulenc to have the same color brightness and intensity as dry pigments, which it achieves by suspending dry pigment in polyvinyl acetate, a synthetic resin otherwise marketed in France at the time by Rhône Poulenc as Rhodopas M or M60A.

In May 1960, Klein deposited a Soleau envelope, registering his paint formulation under the name International Klein Blue (IKB) at the Institut national de la propriété industrielle. The patent was published in April 1961.

Original Recipe (from patent)

Patent No. 63471 Issued Paris, May 19, 1960

IKB has been perfected by Yves Klein le monochrome in the course of the years 1954-55-56-57-58. The current chemical formula is exactly: 

1.2 kilos Rhodopas (paste product) and MA (Rhone Poulenc) (vinyl chrloride) 

2.2 kilos ethyl alcohol. 95% industrial, denatured 

6.0 kilos Ethyl acetate 

A total of 4 kilos 

Mix cold while energetically agitating and never heat uncovered!

Then, mix cold the pure ultramarine blue 1311 in powder with fixative medium, in the proportion of 50%—if one adds 1/10 of the total with pure acetone—and 40%—if one adds pure alcohol.

CONTEMPORARY ADAPTED RECIPE:

Mix together (cold) pure ultramarine blue in powder with fixative medium, in the proportion of 50%.

Ultramarine blue powder and fixative medium can both be purchased in many places. Simpler alternative: find a tube of ultramarine blue that meets your liking and mix with fixative.

CORRESPONDENCE: AN EXHIBITION OF THE LETTERS OF RAY JOHNSON
Link to a downloadable pdf.
Raleigh, North Carolina. North Carolina Museum of Art. (1976.)
Praise to the Raymond Johnson Estate for freeing the art themselves. Available as a downloadable pdf on their site.
Raymond Edward “Ray” Johnson (October 16, 1927 – January 13, 1995), known primarily as a collagist and correspondence artist, was a seminal figure in the history of Neo-Dada and early Pop art. Once called “New York’s most famous unknown artist”, Johnson also staged and participated in early performance art events associated with the Fluxus movement and was the founder of a far-ranging mail art network – the New York Correspondence School – which picked up momentum in the 1960s and is still active today. He lived in New York City from 1949 to 1968, when he moved to a small town in Long island and remained there until his suicide.
Johnson’s first known piece of mail directing a recipient to “please send to…” someone else dates from 1958; the phrases “please add to and return”, “please add and send to”, and even “please do not send to” followed. Johnson’s mail art activities became more systematic with the help of several friends, particularly Bill Wilson and his mother, assemblage artist May Wilson, along with Marie Tavroges Stilkind and Toby Spiselman. In 1962, Ed Plunkett named Johnson’s endeavors ‘the New York Correspondence School’. On April 1, 1968, the first of the meeting of the NYSC was held at the Society of Friends Meeting House on Rutherford Place in New York City. Two more meetings were called by Johnson in the following weeks, including the Seating-Meeting at New York’s Finch College, about which John Gruen reported: “It was … attended by many artists and ‘members’ … all of whom sat around wondering when the meeting would start. It never did … people wrote things on bits of paper, on a blackboard, or simply talked. It was all strangely meaningless – and strangely meaningful.”Johnson staged such events regularly, often following them up with witty typed reports, photocopied for wide distribution via the post. Such gatherings continued to be held in various guises into the mid-1980s.
WANTED: A link to a pdf of Ray Johnson’s The Book Of Death, 13 pages, not in print, unavailable online.

CORRESPONDENCE: AN EXHIBITION OF THE LETTERS OF RAY JOHNSON

Link to a downloadable pdf.

Raleigh, North Carolina. North Carolina Museum of Art. (1976.)

Praise to the Raymond Johnson Estate for freeing the art themselves. Available as a downloadable pdf on their site.

Raymond Edward “Ray” Johnson (October 16, 1927 – January 13, 1995), known primarily as a collagist and correspondence artist, was a seminal figure in the history of Neo-Dada and early Pop art. Once called “New York’s most famous unknown artist”, Johnson also staged and participated in early performance art events associated with the Fluxus movement and was the founder of a far-ranging mail art network – the New York Correspondence School – which picked up momentum in the 1960s and is still active today. He lived in New York City from 1949 to 1968, when he moved to a small town in Long island and remained there until his suicide.

Johnson’s first known piece of mail directing a recipient to “please send to…” someone else dates from 1958; the phrases “please add to and return”, “please add and send to”, and even “please do not send to” followed. Johnson’s mail art activities became more systematic with the help of several friends, particularly Bill Wilson and his mother, assemblage artist May Wilson, along with Marie Tavroges Stilkind and Toby Spiselman. In 1962, Ed Plunkett named Johnson’s endeavors ‘the New York Correspondence School’. On April 1, 1968, the first of the meeting of the NYSC was held at the Society of Friends Meeting House on Rutherford Place in New York City. Two more meetings were called by Johnson in the following weeks, including the Seating-Meeting at New York’s Finch College, about which John Gruen reported: “It was … attended by many artists and ‘members’ … all of whom sat around wondering when the meeting would start. It never did … people wrote things on bits of paper, on a blackboard, or simply talked. It was all strangely meaningless – and strangely meaningful.”Johnson staged such events regularly, often following them up with witty typed reports, photocopied for wide distribution via the post. Such gatherings continued to be held in various guises into the mid-1980s.

WANTED: A link to a pdf of Ray Johnson’s The Book Of Death, 13 pages, not in print, unavailable online.

John Cage - 4'33"

John Cage

4’ 33”

4′33″ (pronounced “Four minutes, thirty-three seconds” or just “Four thirty-three”) is a three-movement composition by American experimental composer John Cage (1912–1992). It was composed in 1952, for any instrument or combination of instruments, and the score instructs the performer(s) not to play their instrument(s) during the entire duration of the piece throughout the three movements. The piece purports to consist of the sounds of the environment that the listeners hear while it is performed,[4] although it is commonly perceived as “four minutes thirty-three seconds of silence”. The title of the piece refers to the total length in minutes and seconds of a given performance, 4′33″ being the total length of the first public performance.

Conceived around 1947–1948, while the composer was working on Sonatas and Interludes, 4′33″ became for Cage the epitome of his idea that any sounds may constitute music. It was also a reflection of the influence of Zen Buddhism, which Cage studied since the late 1940s. In a 1982 interview, and on numerous other occasions, Cage stated that 4′33″ was, in his opinion, his most important work. The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians describes 4′33″ as Cage’s “most famous and controversial creation”

DOWNLOAD from Scribd.
Pre-dating zines, conceptual work, the archive, artist books. Hard to find online. Duchamp published this collection of 94 documents to explain some of his thinking and to show some of the preliminary works relating to The Large Glass. The notes were left loose so that their relationships for the reader would be determined by chance.
Marcel Duchamp (1887‑1968)
The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors Even (The Green Box)
La Mariée mise à nu par ses célibataires même (Boîte verte)
1934
Medium
Cardboard box, color plate and 94 lithographs, collotypes and ink on paper
Tate
Acquisition

DOWNLOAD from Scribd.

Pre-dating zines, conceptual work, the archive, artist books. Hard to find online. Duchamp published this collection of 94 documents to explain some of his thinking and to show some of the preliminary works relating to The Large Glass. The notes were left loose so that their relationships for the reader would be determined by chance.

Marcel Duchamp (1887‑1968)

The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors Even (The Green Box)

La Mariée mise à nu par ses célibataires même (Boîte verte)

1934

Medium

Cardboard box, color plate and 94 lithographs, collotypes and ink on paper

Tate

Acquisition

Wall Drawing #541
from Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Instructions

Certificate of authenticity

Wall Drawing #541

from Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Instructions

Certificate of authenticity

Kiss (1963) is an experimental film directed by Andy Warhol, which runs 50 minutes and features various couples — man and woman, woman and woman, man and man — kissing for 3½ minutes each. The film features Naomi Levine, Gerard Malanga, Rufus Collins, Johnny Dodd, and Ed Sanders.

Kiss was followed by Eat (1963), Sleep (1963), and Blow Job (1964).

This was one of the first films Warhol made at The Factory in New York City.

Date:1964Production:USAMedium:16mm print, black and white, silent, approx. 54 min.Credit Line:The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Film Preservation ProgramMoMA Number:F553Copyright:© 2014 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York